So far this year, 594 people have been shot and killed by American police

This blog post is to discuss a recent article in the Washington Post newspaper. The internet link for the article is here.

I lived in the United States for many years. I went through high school there. After graduation I served in the American army during the Viet Nam war. I still have family living in the States. A brother and sister, nieces and nephews, along with my mother. Yet there are many reasons I refuse to go to the U.S. ever again. They have FEMA camps setup “to protect people” But if they are supposed to be places to protect those who are put inside them then why are the machine guns in the towers pointing inward towards the “protected” people? Why is the barb wire at the top of the double fencing lean inward to keep them inside instead of leaning outward to keep the “bad people” out?

The police forces all across America are getting more and more military style training, more “surplus” military equipment is being transferred to local police detachments, and every year more people are being shot and killed by local police, police who are being investigated and even charged under the criminal code by one police force are still actively serving on the streets in cruisers and carrying guns in other police departments while up on criminal charges! Watch the video here below to see a few examples of how some police have been caught behaving.

Police departments in the United States are under increased scrutiny for violent, often fatal interactions with suspects. So far this year, 594 people have been shot and killed by American police, according to The Washington Post’s Fatal Force database. Last year, American police shot and killed 963 people.

Here is yet another reason to immigrate to Canada and stay out of the United States.

A cop stopped a car for speeding — then pointed a gun at a passenger for more than 9 minutes

The Washington Post     by Amy B Wang

(note that you have to log in to Facebook to see the video at https://www.facebook.com/LOLO.FEO.TRIPLEXHOGGS/videos/vb.100000096340755/1577636055582924/?type=2&theater )

This video taken during a traffic stop in California is drawing debate over the officer’s decision to keep his gun pointed at the passenger for more than nine minutes.

The stop took place last Wednesday morning along U.S. Route 101, south of San Jose, after an officer noticed a car pass him going 85 mph, according to the Campbell Police Department.

After stopping the car for speeding, the officer requested the driver’s license and additional paperwork. The driver and passenger spent several minutes looking for the paperwork before the officer walked back to his motorcycle to write a citation, police said.

It was at that point their stories diverged. According to police, the passenger began reaching “under his seat.”

“It is not clear why the passenger chose to reach under the seat since the officer was not requesting any other paperwork,” Campbell police said in a statement. “Unfortunately, the passenger’s unexpected movement towards the bottom of the seat, caused the officer to perceive a threat and draw his handgun.”

However, a man sitting in the vehicle’s passenger seat — the target of the officer’s gun — maintained throughout the incident that he had simply been reaching for some papers on the floor to try to find the vehicle’s license and registration, as requested.

A video that apparently was recorded by a woman in the car begins as the male passenger is expressing incredulity that the officer has pulled a gun.

“Wow,” the passenger says in the video, laughing. “We’re looking for the f—ing paperwork, bro. Oh my God.”

“I understand that,” the officer replies. “Don’t move, all right?”

The passenger sounds indignant as his hands remain on his lap. “Why are you still pointing that gun at me, bro?” he asks the officer. “Why are you still pointing the gun at me, though? Record this sh-t. Why are you still pointing the gun at me, bro? My hands are right here.”

“I understand,” the officer says.

“No, you don’t understand,” the passenger protests, as the officer tells him to relax. “No, I’m not going to relax. Get the f—king gun off me.”

A woman in the car asks the officer: “Is that really necessary? His hands are both out.”

The officer says that it is necessary as he waits for backup to arrive, eliciting another round of protests from the vehicle’s passengers. For several more minutes, they remain at an impasse, with the passenger muttering periodic complaints as music plays in the background. The entire time, the officer’s gun is trained on the man.

Toward the end, the officer relays something through the radio and the passenger begins protesting again. At one point in the video, the officer mentions that there had been a screwdriver on the floor of the car.

“Why are you trying to make this bigger than it is, bro?” the passenger says. “We complied with everything you asked for.”

The video lasts a little more than nine minutes total, and the officer’s gun is pointed at the male passenger the entire time. Police said in a statement the officer had to wait longer than usual for backup to arrive “and provide assistance in safely resolving the situation.”

“We understand that it is never a comfortable position to have a gun pointed at you, regardless of whether it is a police officer,” police said. “Unfortunately, the length of time that the officer’s gun was drawn lasted much longer than normal based on his location.”

Police said the traffic stop was resolved amicably. The police can say anything they want but does that make it true? Pretty much everyone lies to side public sympathy to their point of view. Just look at politicians.

“In the end, the officer had a conversation with the passenger of the vehicle explaining his actions and why the gun was pointed at him,” police said. “The passenger indicated he understood why it happened and actually apologized to the officer. Both the driver and the passenger were issued citations and were allowed to leave.”

However, the video was uploaded to Facebook last Saturday with a caption that suggested there may not have been as much understanding as police thought. (Note: The video contains profanity.)

“CAMPBELL COP IS A B—-!!!!!!!!!!” wrote a Facebook user named “Feo Mas” who identified himself as the passenger in the video. “(He) pulled out a gun cuz I reached for paperwork he asked for.”

A week later, the video had amassed nearly 2 million views on Facebook, as well as tens of thousands more on YouTube. Online, a debate raged: Several people defended the police officer and said they felt the passenger should have remained quiet, while others were outraged at how long the officer had trained his gun on the passenger despite the man’s hands being visible at all times.

American Police departments are under increased scrutiny for violent, often fatal interactions with suspects. So far this year, 594 people have been shot and killed by American police, according to The Washington Post’s Fatal Force database. Last year, police in the United States shot and killed 963 people.

The Facebook user who posted the video did not respond to an interview request sent by Facebook Sunday.

The Campbell Police Department said in a statement it was aware of the video circulating online, as well as the thousands of comments surrounding it. Police also cited an officer-involved shooting that had taken place in nearby Los Banos, Calif., as an example of the “unfortunate reality” that people sometimes attack police.

“As an agency, we can understand the response to the Facebook video, and that is why we have and will continue engaging our community,” police said. “The comments on the Facebook video bring up a lot of different viewpoints about how the officer could have responded differently or used different tactics. Our officers receive a tremendous amount of training on a consistent basis and that training is what dictates our response. This is intended to protect our officers as well as those they come in contact with.”

Police said they had reviewed footage from the officer’s body cam, which included the beginning and end of the incident not shown in the Facebook video. However the police department did not release any footage from the officer’s camera and did not immediately respond to an email Sunday. My question is this. If the officers body cam showed something different or showed a reason why he felt necessary to hold his gun on the passenger of the car then why not release that video. I can only conclude that the video from the body cam would back up what was said by the passenger in that there was no proper reason for him to be threatened by the police officer. That the pointing of the gun and the threatening by the officer were purely for the satisfaction of the officer so that he would feel power and authority to use deadly force if he so decided.

“We are thankful that this incident resolved itself with no one getting injured and hope that this additional information provides clarification,” police said.

Cleve R. Wootson Jr. contributed to this report.

Read more:

Another sheriff’s deputy dies by suicide. This time, his boss wants people to talk about it.

‘I told him I can’t breathe’: Police punch teen girl after mistaking her for black male suspect

Like I said there are reasons I stay out of the United States and will not even travel there to visit my 94 year old mother who lives in Florida. If anyone wants to live in North America I say to each and everyone come to Canada to live and grow and have a gentle family life. The United States is no longer the home of the free if it ever was. That is my opinion anyway….

Gordon Davis

The 10 best jobs of the future

1. ten best jobs
ten best jobs

The 10 best jobs of the future

The job market is looking good. The unemployment rate is hovering below the 5% mark, as it has been for more than a year. But not every profession is booming. “In general, it’s a very robust labor market with a lot of widespread growth,” says Josh Wright of labor market research firm Economic Modeling Specialists International (EMSI). “A few key sectors are trending up, but some are trending down.”

To help you identify which is which, we made it our job to crunch the numbers. Starting with a list of 785 popular occupations, we narrowed the choices to 10 of the most promising by focusing on fields that are projected to expand greatly over the next decade and currently offer generous paychecks. In fact, all of the jobs on our list have annual salaries that are well above—and in many cases more than double—the median for all jobs. We also favoured jobs that don’t necessarily call for a huge investment in education to get started. While four of our top jobs do require advanced degrees, you can break into the other professions with an associate’s or bachelor’s degree. Click through to take a look at 10 of the best jobs for the future.

Please note that because people from all over the world read these blogs to avoid confusion we have done all money in American dollars.

SEE ALSO: Best Jobs That Don’t Require a College Degree

2. app developer
app developer

App Developer

Total number of jobs: 798,233

Projected job growth, 2016-2026: 21.6% (All jobs: 8.6%)

Median annual salary: $97,483 (All jobs: $43,233)

Typical education: Bachelor’s degree

Why become an app developer? Check the palm of your hand (or maybe in the couch cushions) for the answer. The proliferation of mobile technology is driving demand for development of new applications of all kinds, from news and games to music and social sharing. Systems software developers, who create the operating systems for computers and mobile devices, are also poised for prosperity. From about 414,000 jobs currently, the workforce is projected to grow 16.0% by 2026. Systems software developers earn a median income of $104,767 a year.

A college degree in computer science, software engineering (both among our best college majors for a lucrative career) or a related field is a standard requirement to land most software-development jobs, but a master’s degree can give you a leg up on the competition. Without a bachelor’s degree, you can break into the tech field as a web developer, a role that typically requires just an associate’s degree to get started and pays a median salary of about $60,385 a year. Also, the number of such jobs is expected to grow 26.5% to nearly 214,850 positions by 2026. Beyond formal education, expect to keep learning throughout your career in any tech job; you need to stay on top of any new tools, computer languages and other advances.

SEE ALSO: 10 Best College Majors for Your Career

3. Computer Systems Analyst
Computer Systems Analyst

Computer Systems Analyst

Total number of jobs: 597,812

Projected job growth, 2016-2026: 22.0%

Median annual salary: $85,080

Typical education: Bachelor’s degree

This is a nerd’s world, and we’re all benefiting from it. With the computerization of everything from phones and coffeemakers to cars and airplanes, you’d be hard-pressed to find a business that doesn’t rely on computers in one way or another. That puts the folks who run the computers in very high demand. Computer systems analysts ensure that organizations’ technological needs are met and are constantly improving with the advancements and demands of the increasingly connected world. Information security analysts—the white hats charged with protecting us from the increasing digital dangers—are also in high demand with their current count of 92,902 people expected to grow 19.6% by 2026.

A bachelor’s degree in information technology or another computer-related field is typical for these workers. But you can also qualify with a liberal arts degree and techie talents you developed outside of a standard four-year program (perhaps even using free online classes).

Further up the career ladder, once you’ve picked up five or more years of experience in this field, you might shoot to become a Computer and Information Systems Manager. The median pay for this position is about $130,400 a year, and demand for it is projected to grow by 17.9% percent over the next decade.

4. Nurse Practitioner
Nurse Practitioner

Nurse Practitioner

Total number of jobs: 145,331

Projected job growth, 2016-2026: 32.3%

Median annual salary: $98,288

Typical education: Master’s degree

Health care coverage in our country may be up for debate as some areas have more doctors per person than others. But the increasing need for quality medical care is irrefutable. Advancing technology, greater focus on preventive care and an aging population will mean a growing number of patients requiring care in hospitals, doctors’ offices, long-term-care facilities and even private homes. Nurse practitioners (NPs) are highly sought after to meet that need. They’re able to provide much of the same care as full-fledged doctors, including performing routine checkups and writing prescriptions, and they can work independently. Exact guidelines vary by Province and Territory.

Registered nurses (RNs) are also in high demand. The already robust workforce of 2.9 million is expected to grow 17.2% by 2026. And they enjoy a healthy pay rate, too: The median salary for RNs is $67,418 a year.

Becoming a nurse requires either a bachelor’s of science in nursing (another one of our best college majors), an associate’s degree in nursing or a diploma from an accredited nursing program (which usually takes two to three years). NPs must also get a master’s or doctoral degree. Both RNs and NPs need a license to practice, not to mention reserves of compassion, patience and emotional stability.

5. Physical Therapist
Physical Therapist

Physical Therapist

Total number of jobs: 226,661

Projected job growth, 2016-2026: 30.4%

Median annual salary: $83,501

Typical education: Doctoral degree

Aging baby boomers are a boon for those working in physical therapy. Many more workers will be needed in this field to care for victims of heart attacks and strokes and to lead them through rehabilitation. And with ongoing advances in medicine, more people will survive such traumas and need rehabilitative services. You’ll need a license to go along with your doctorate.

For similar reasons, demand for occupational therapists is expected to grow at a 25.6% clip over the next decade. While physical therapists focus on rehabilitation of major motor functions, occupational therapists help ill or disabled patients develop or recover the ability to independently perform daily tasks, such as dressing or feeding themselves. Occupational therapists typically need a master’s degree to get started and earn a median income of $79,619 a year.

6. Health Services Manager
Health Services Manager

Health Services Manager

Total number of jobs: 337,863

Projected job growth, 2016-2026: 17.4%

Median annual salary: $93,294

Typical education: Bachelor’s degree

The increasing demand for medical services calls for more people to manage them. Health services managers may oversee the functions of an entire medical practice or facility—as a nursing home administrator, for example—or a specific department, as a clinical manager for, say, surgery or physical therapy. Health information managers work specifically on maintaining patient records and keeping them secure, an especially important task as everyone is shifting to digital.

A bachelor’s in health administration is the ticket to this profession, but a master’s in health services, long-term-care administration or public health is also common among these workers. You may need to be licensed to run certain types of facilities, such as a nursing home, for which all Provinces and Territories require licensure, or an assisted-living facility. Check with your local department of health for details.

7. Physician's Assistant
Physician’s Assistant

Physician’s Assistant

Total number of jobs: 103,422

Projected job growth, 2016-2026: 28.8%

Median annual salary: $98,869

Typical education: Master’s degree

Physician’s assistants (PAs) are similar to nurse practitioners in knowledge and abilities. PAs are trained to diagnose and treat patients and are able to write prescriptions and order tests. But unlike NPs, they work under the supervision of physicians and surgeons. (Again, specific duties and supervision requirements vary depending on the Province or Territory you work in.)

To get started, you need at least two years of postgraduate study to earn a master’s in this field, and you need a license to practice. While the extra schooling is costly, it’s less taxing than a full M.D. According to the Canadian Medical Association, the average medical student graduates with more than $180,000 in debt.

8. Dental Hygienist
Dental Hygienist

Dental Hygienist

Total number of jobs: 207,223

Projected job growth, 2016-2026: 19.0%

Median annual salary: $73,141

Typical education: Associate’s degree

People in the oral health field have a great deal to smile about. In addition to growing demand for dental hygienists, the numbers of dentists and dental assistants are also expected to increase—by 12.4% and 19.6%, respectively, over the next 10 years.

The median salary for a dental hygienist, who typically cleans teeth, takes x-rays and educates patients on proper care, is about double that of a dental assistant. (A dental assistant’s duties may include prepping patients for treatment and sterilizing equipment.) And the path to get started as a hygienist is much less costly than that of a dentist. You usually need an associate’s degree in dental hygiene, which typically takes three years to complete. You also have to get a license to practice. Requirements vary by Province or Teritory. Learn more from the Dental Hygienists’ Association.

9. Market Research Analyst
Market Research Analyst

Market Research Analyst

Total number of jobs: 557,031

Projected job growth, 2016-2026: 20.9%

Median annual salary: $61,816

Typical education: Bachelor’s degree

With advancing technology allowing companies to collect more data about their operations and customers, the need is greater for people who can make sense (and dollars) of it all. Enter the consultants. Market research analysts help companies navigate an increasingly competitive business landscape by crunching numbers and studying market conditions and consumer behavior. With their analyses, they can develop effective marketing strategies, which may include setting appropriate prices and choosing advantageous store locations. Similarly, operations research analysts help firms increase efficiency, lower costs and boost profits, using mathematical and analytical methods. They are expected to grow their own numbers 28.4% to 134,180 by 2026, and their median salary is $78,666 a year.

While a bachelor’s degree can get you into either position, a master’s degree can help you secure a top spot. Prospective market research analysts should study marketing research (obviously) or a related field, such as statistics or math. Future operations research analysts might study a technical or quantitative field, such as engineering, analytics or (again) math. Work experience or a strong background in statistical and data analysis will give you an added advantage.

10. Personal Financial Adviser
Personal Financial Adviser

Personal Financial Adviser

Total number of jobs: 251,715

Projected job growth, 2016-2026: 23.8%

Median annual salary: $86,780

Typical education: Bachelor’s degree

As Canadians age and pensions become a thing of the past, the value of good investment advice will only grow. Baby boomers, especially, could need more professional help as they plan for and enter retirement.

You usually have to be a college grad to get on this career path. A bachelor’s degree in finance, economics, accounting or a similar field would best prepare you for dealing with money matters, but most employers don’t specify a required major. Certification from the Certified Financial Planner Board of Standards—which requires you to earn a bachelor’s degree, have at least three years of relevant work experience and pass a rigorous exam on a wide range of financial issues—adds to your credibility. Licensing is required to sell certain types of insurance and investment products. SEE ALSO: Learn the Difference Between Brokers and Advisers

11. Speech Language Pathologist
Speech Language Pathologist

Speech Language Pathologist

Total number of jobs: 142,715

Projected job growth, 2016-2026: 21.0%

Median annual salary: $73,334

Typical education: Master’s degree

The health care industry, in general, continues to be an attractive field, driven in large part by the aging population. Speech therapists, specifically, are needed to treat the growing number of patients whose language has been affected by health conditions associated with aging, such as hearing loss or stroke. Greater attention to treating children with language disorders, such as stuttering, also drives demand for these professionals, about half of whom are employed by schools, according to Canada’s Bureau of Labor Statistics. See the Statistics by subject or profession here in Canada.

In addition to having a master’s degree, a speech language pathologist usually needs to be licensed by the Province or Territory they choose to live and work in. Check with the SAC (Speech – Language & Audiology Canada) for more information.

North America’s happiest and unhappiest workers revealed

unhappiest-2 mechanics
unhappiest-2 mechanics

© Shutterstock

Using recent data from job site CareerBliss, which calculated factors such as workplace culture, management, environment and rewards to determine a happiness score, we round up the happiest and unhappiest jobs in North America and what they pay. [All pay data is in American dollars so people overseas can understand things more easily.]

10. Chief operating officer – ‘bliss rating’ of 3.521
10. Chief operating officer – ‘bliss rating’ of 3.521

© Shutterstock

10. Chief operating officer – ‘bliss rating’ of 3.521

Starting off the countdown to the happiest job is a COO. A high-pressured job, which involves reporting directly to the CEO of a company, can’t be easy, but the six-figure salary probably has something to do with happiness levels. The average COO earns around $150,000 a year.

9. Software quality assurance engineer: 3.527
9. Software quality assurance engineer: 3.527

© Shutterstock

9. Software quality assurance engineer: 3.527

Software QA engineers are responsible for making sure all software products function as well as they can. And with that comes a pretty nice salary too. Software QA engineers earn an average salary of $65,779 a year.

8. Lead developer: 3.533
8. Lead developer: 3.533

© Shutterstock

8. Lead developer: 3.533

Also responsible for the programming of software is a lead developer, who researches new technologies, sets the technical direction of the development team and has the final say on matters. That level of responsibility doesn’t pay so badly either. The average salary for lead developers is $84,296.

7. Engineer: 3.534
7. Engineer: 3.534

© Shutterstock

7. Engineer: 3.534

The seventh happiest professionals are lead engineers. Why? According to research, engineers enjoy the challenge of finding solutions to difficult problems. They also earn a great salary for doing so. Engineers get an average salary of around $92,538 a year.

6. Chief technology officer: 3.542
6. Chief technology officer: 3.542

© Shutterstock

6. Chief technology officer: 3.542

In charge of helping companies improve their information systems, the role of a CTO is primarily leadership, but it also requires excellent knowledge of modern IT. These happy folks earn a hefty $121,691 a year.

5. Android developer: 3.552
5. Android developer: 3.552

© Bloomicon/Shutterstock

5. Android developer: 3.552

With a $56,120 salary, Android developers don’t do so badly when it comes to pay day. And as research shows, the people who create apps for android are pretty happy generally too.

4. Senior Java developer: 3.590
4. Senior Java developer: 3.590

© Shutterstock

4. Senior Java developer: 3.590

A senior Java developer is responsible for creating and testing computer programs using the programming language of Java. Due to its technical nature, senior Java developers earn around $98,814 and, naturally, they’re very happy about it

3. Research assistant: 3.619
3. Research assistant: 3.619

© Shutterstock

3. Research assistant: 3.619

Not interested in working in tech? Why not become a research assistant instead? CareerBliss’s survey shows those who work in research really enjoy their job. And it’s not just because of the money either. The average salary for a research assistant is $31,624, which is actually 68% less than the national average for all those working in North America.

2. Full stack developer: 3.660
2. Full stack developer: 3.660

© Shutterstock

2. Full stack developer: 3.660

The final developer on this list (yes, there really are more) is a full stack developer. And what do they do, you ask? They are basically the kings and queens of developers; they have familiarity with all software technology and know-how to work with anything from user experience to issues with the server and network. And with such knowledge comes decent money: professionals in this role have an average salary of $72,856 a year.

1. Recruiter: 3.673 – the happiest job
1. Recruiter: 3.673 – the happiest job

© Shutterstock

1. Recruiter: 3.673 – the happiest job

Contrary to previous evidence, the happiest job in America isn’t in tech, it’s in recruitment. Yes, really. Who would’ve thought it? Recruiters earn an average salary of $56,715.

And what are the unhappiest jobs?

Now let’s count down America’s unhappiest employees…

the unhappiest jobs?
the unhappiest jobs?

 

10. Service technician
10. Service technician

© Shutterstock

10. Service technician

Sometimes referred to as motor vehicle mechanics, service technicians inspect, repair and diagnose automotive problems. The average salary for a service technician is $36,000.

9. Machine operator: 2.604
9. Machine operator: 2.604

© Shutterstock

9. Machine operator: 2.604

Responsible for preparing machines for operation or running and monitoring machines, there are elements to this job that can clearly be somewhat robotic for some. The average machine operator is paid around $30,000 a year.

8. Sales representatives: 2.587
8. Sales representatives: 2.587

© Shutterstock

8. Sales representatives: 2.587

Earning $41,000, which is 39% less than the national average for all working North Americans, sales representatives may have the gift of the gab, but they don’t necessarily have the gift of a happy career.

7. Guard: 2.554
7. Guard: 2.554

© Shutterstock

7. Guard: 2.554

Protecting people for a living isn’t easy, and it can be very physically grueling. That’s why it’s probably not much of a surprise that professionals in this field are among the unhappiest. The average salary for a security guard stands at $24,000 – 87% less than the average wage of all working North Americans.

6. Maintenance manager: 2.548
6. Maintenance manager: 2.548

© Shutterstock

6. Maintenance manager: 2.548

Maintenance managers make sure all machinery, industrial equipment and buildings are in good shape. But despite the average $70,000 salary for this role, it is still considered to be the sixth unhappiest job.

5. Driver: 2.505
5. Driver: 2.505

© Shutterstock

5. Driver: 2.505

Long hours on the road and lack of sleep could be a contributing factor to the reason so many drivers are unhappy with their work. Another reason is the amount of paperwork and problems in crossing the border with the United States. The average salary for drivers is $30,000 annually.

4. Cashier: 2.492
4. Cashier: 2.492

© Robert Hoetink/Shutterstock

4. Cashier: 2.492

With an average salary of $18,500 a year, cashiers work hard, with hours spanning across evening and weekends, and many don’t get the salary to match.

3. Merchandiser: 2.402
3. Merchandiser: 2.402

© Shutterstock

3. Merchandiser: 2.402

Working in fashion might seem like the dream to most, but it seems not for merchandisers. Professionals working this role are responsible for the presentation of goods in a retail store, working to maximize sales of a product line. The average salary for this role stands at $28,000 – 74% less than the national average.

2. Security officer: 2.359
2. Security officer: 2.359

© Shutterstock

2. Security officer: 2.359

Security officers (AKA security guards) are responsible for protecting company property from crimes such as vandalism, but there can also be periods where there is barely anything for them to do but watch, which could be one of the reasons happiness levels are so low. Another is the pay; average salaries hover around $26,000 a year, which is 80% less than the average worker.

1. Sales account manager: 2.343 – the unhappiest job
1. Sales account manager: 2.343 – the unhappiest job

© Shutterstock

1. Sales account manager: 2.343 – the unhappiest job

Proving money can’t buy happiness, sales account managers earn on average a not too shabby $56,000 a year, plus commission, yet it is the unhappiest job to work in, according to the CareerBliss data.

 

Ten Places With the Best Weather in Canada

There are too many beautiful places to see and things to do in Canada. These are the top 10 places with the most warm sunny days to enjoy.

10. Vaughan, Ont.

10.Vaughn,Ont.
10.Vaughn,Ont.

© Used with permission of / © Rogers Media Inc. 2017

Total rainfall (mm): 697.01
Days with daily min. temperature above 0°C: 211.74
Days with daily max. temperature above 20°C: 116.77

9. Leamington, Ont.

9.Leamington,Ont.
9.Leamington,Ont.

© Used with permission of / © Rogers Media Inc. 2017

Total rainfall (mm): 814.23
Days with daily min. temperature above 0°C: 246.07
Days with daily max. temperature above 20°C: 123.67

8. Kingsville, Ont.

8.Kingsville,Ont.
8.Kingsville,Ont.

© Used with permission of / © Rogers Media Inc. 2017

Total rainfall (mm): 814.2
Days with daily min. temperature above 0°C: 246.1
Days with daily max. temperature above 20°C: 123.7

7. Burlington, Ont.

7.Burlington,Ont.
7.Burlington,Ont.

© Used with permission of / © Rogers Media Inc. 2017

Total rainfall (mm): 763.27
Days with daily min. temperature above 0°C: 239.02
Days with daily max. temperature above 20°C: 125.32

6. Brampton, Ont.

6.Brampton,Ont.
6.Brampton,Ont.

© Used with permission of / © Rogers Media Inc. 2017

Total rainfall (mm): 681.59
Days with daily min. temperature above 0°C: 228.7
Days with daily max. temperature above 20°C: 122.26

5. Mississauga, Ont.

5.Mississauga,Ont.
5.Mississauga,Ont.

© Used with permission of / © Rogers Media Inc. 2017

Total rainfall (mm): 723.1
Days with daily min. temperature above 0°C: 242.43
Days with daily max. temperature above 20°C: 102.78

4. Uxbridge, Ont.

4.Uxbridge,Ont.
4.Uxbridge,Ont.

© Used with permission of / © Rogers Media Inc. 2017

Total rainfall (mm): 728.7
Days with daily min. temperature above 0°C: 220.83
Days with daily max. temperature above 20°C: 118.74

3. Oakville, Ont.

3.Oakville,Ont.
3.Oakville,Ont.

© Used with permission of / © Rogers Media Inc. 2017

Total rainfall (mm): 725.63
Days with daily min. temperature above 0°C: 221.7
Days with daily max. temperature above 20°C: 107.18

2. Toronto, Ont.

2.Toronto,Ont.
2.Toronto,Ont.

© Used with permission of / © Rogers Media Inc. 2017

Total rainfall (mm): 714.02
Days with daily min. temperature above 0°C: 264.39
Days with daily max. temperature above 20°C: 117.23

1. Thorold, Ont.

1.Thorold,Ont.
1.Thorold,Ont.

© Used with permission of / © Rogers Media Inc. 2017

Total rainfall (mm): 756.4
Days with daily min. temperature above 0°C: 239.7
Days with daily max. temperature above 20°C: 115.3

To see more weather statistics.

This is Canada: What parenting looks like from coast to coast

From a an all-skateboarder crew in Calgary to a multi-generational household in Toronto to a single mom and her kids in Montreal, here are our favourite pics of Canadian families doing what they do best—being awesome at being themselves!

Montreal, Quebec

Our family: Nicki Tatola, son Seve James, 9½, and daughter Nia Leance, 7½

Nicki Tatola and children
Nicki Tatola and children

© Used with permission of / © Rogers Media Inc. 2017. Photos: Nicki Tatola

Can you tell us about these pictures?

Nicki: This picture was taken in Trinidad, where we were visiting my mom’s family. I like it because I have very few photos with the three of us because I’m always taking the pictures! It’s also cute that we’re all dressed up for my uncle’s 70th birthday party.

Nicki Tatola Son
Nicki Tatola Son

© Used with permission of / © Rogers Media Inc. 2017. nicki’s son seve on his first day of school

This was the first day of school last year. Seve was excited about seeing his friends and his new haircut, and he had been begging me for those soccer shoes all summer. When I finally caved, we learned that his size was men’s, not boys’, so they cost even more. The bonus is that I can wear them, too!

Nicki Tatola children
Nicki Tatola children

 © Used with permission of / © Rogers Media Inc. 2017. brother and sister play by the pool

This is at the local pool. Summer camp was over, and I was on vacation. We just hung out at the park and rode bikes for two weeks. It was so relaxing! The only questions we had to think about were “Should we have a picnic?” and “Should we take a ball or the bikes to the park?” So much fun!

Nicki Tatola daughter
Nicki Tatola daughter

 © Used with permission of / © Rogers Media Inc. 2017. a little girl is playing baseball

This picture is my girl, two summers ago. I grew up as one of the only girls on the boys’ basketball team, so I taught Nia at a young age—four years old, I think—that girls can play anything boys can and that the only way to compete is to be tough and brave. As girls, a lot of times we don’t get the ball passed to us in sports, so I told her that she has to practice twice as much as the boys so that she can steal it when she’s on defense. That way, she won’t rely on the boys!

What’s the most challenging thing about raising a family?

There isn’t enough time. I’m alone with them, so I’m constantly telling them what needs to be done and rushing them. I must sound like a crazy person! That’s why we do la grasse matinée, which just means to chill out, on one day of the weekend. We do this every Saturday before we go to swimming lessons and do groceries.

What’s the most “Canadian” moment you’ve experienced as a family?

The most Canadian experience is very Montrealaise. I was at the doctor’s office, waiting for my daughter to have a checkup, when she was about five. A younger girl came to talk to her first in French. My daughter responded in French, but the girl noticed her accent and asked if she speaks English. My daughter said, “Yes, I speak English and Spanish.” (She takes classes at school.) The girl, who must have been around four, said, “Only three languages? I speak four!” I was laughing so much.

What’s your favourite thing about living in Canada?

My favorite thing about being Canadian is multiculturalism. My kids are comfortable in their own skin, and they’re a mix of Indian, African, Scottish and British and have friends from all over the world! They know there’s such a thing as racism, but I don’t think they will experience it the way I did growing up in the Prairies, where you’re either black, white or First Nations. We were beige, and that was weird.

Saskatoon, Saskatchewan

Our family: Grandma Monica Goulet, mom Sasha and daughters Ava, 9, and Nahla, 5

Grandma Monica Goulet and family
Grandma Monica Goulet and family

 © Used with permission of / © Rogers Media Inc. 2017. Photos: Sasha Goulet

Can you tell us about these pictures?

Sasha: We’re a Cree Metis family. Growing up in northern Saskatchewan, fishing was a cultural pastime and an economic necessity. It was wonderful to be able to share this experience with my family.

Grandma Monica fishing
Grandma Monica fishing

 © Used with permission of / © Rogers Media Inc. 2017. two girls fishing on the back of a boat

Monica: This is the first time the girls ever fished with me and Sasha. It was hilarious because I snagged a big jackfish. We were just in a small paddleboat and there was a dip between the two girls, who were seated at the back. I reeled in the jackfish and tried to put it in the dip. It started flopping around like crazy and freaked both girls out!

What’s the most “Canadian” moment you’ve experienced as a family?

Sasha: Our favourite family activity is definitely camping, and it’s also our most Canadian experience. We do it every year.

What’s your favourite thing about living in Canada?

Sasha: My favourite thing about living in Canada is the wilderness. We take advantage of our summers and explore quite a bit. I also love winter! We live in a condo, so we don’t have to shovel, but we have a lot of fun outside making snowmen and snow angels, and the girls love sledding.

Monica: For me, it’s been extremely important to raise my children and my grandchildren to be proud of their indigenous ancestry. I experienced a great deal of racism growing up and still do from time to time because I’m identifiably aboriginal. I don’t think my children or grandchildren have been targeted because they look white. They’ve been raised to be friends with children from many different cultures. I think that’s very important.

Novar, Ontario

Family: Dad David Clemmer, papa Stéphane Aubin, merère (grandmother) Pauline Aubin, perère (grandfather) Rene Arthur Aubin and Frances “Frankie’ Renée Aubin Clemmer, 1.5

Where do you live?

We live in a lovely house on Mirage Lake with two miniature dachshunds, one chihuahua, one peacock, 12 chickens, eight quails, 12 budgies and a turtle named Fred. And my in-laws live next door in a pied-à-terre.

Grandma Monica husband with baby
Grandma Monica husband with baby

 © Used with permission of / © Rogers Media Inc. 2017. Photo: David Clemmer

Can you tell us about these pictures?

David: This picture of Frankie with Stéphane melts our heart. Frankie was born one month premature, and we barely made it to the hospital before this little ball of wonder entered the world and changed our lives forever.

She instantly loved skin-on-skin cuddle time with her dads, and she still does.

Grandma Monica husband with baby Frankie
Grandma Monica husband with baby Frankie

 © Used with permission of / © Rogers Media Inc. 2017. a father and daughter laugh both with pigtails

This pictures makes us smile so much! We were in Puerto Vallarta Mexico having a little family vacay and finishing a swim on the rooftop pool. Frankie loves to get her hair brushed while getting dressed and will bring her brush over when she wants it done (or redone if I do it). Stéphane is a much more talented “hair” dad than I am. We were both being a bit silly before heading for lunch, and she wanted to brush my hair and give me a ponytail, too. Neither of us has much hair to work with, but we managed to wear our new looks proudly on our daddy lunch date.

baby curls daddies har
baby curls daddies hair

 © Used with permission of / © Rogers Media Inc. 2017. a father and daughter laugh together

This photo of Papa and Frankie captures my happy babies, both big and small. They both love to smile, and Frankie is showing off her new teeth. She still touches her teeth in amazement and then stares at ours and touches ours as well. It’s almost as if she puts together how similar we are.

Papa and Frankie
Papa and Frankie

 © Used with permission of / © Rogers Media Inc. 2017. A father carries baby in a carrier at an outdoor picnic

We take Frankie with us everywhere. She is such a good baby, and we want to help socialize her in all situations. We were invited to our friends’ barnyard barbecue, so we packed up the family. The food, the company and the family fun we had—it was amazing! Frankie got to see pigs, cows and horses—animals we don’t have, thank goodness!

What’s the most challenging thing about raising a family?

Scheduling is the most challenging thing. We each run a company 2½ hours away. During the week, I’m at Judy Inc in Toronto, (David owns Judy Inc, an international artist management agency) and I spend weekends up north. Frankie is with me for two weeks of the month and up north with Stéphane for the other two weeks (Stéphane runs the Northridge Inn & Resort). It’s the best when we’re all together on weekends. Even if we have lots going on, as long as we’re together, we’re golden. It’s quality over quantity—at least in the summer months, when both businesses are booming.

What’s the most “Canadian” moment you’ve experienced as a family?

We bought a resort in North Muskoka on Lake Bernard called The Northridge Inn 2½ years ago. It has been a labour of love preparing it for our guests. Spending time there with Frankie and our family lets us experience the best this country has to offer. We all swim, fish and hike and, while doing so, we’re surrounded by amazing Canadian rock formations. The picturesque views and sunsets are something out of a coffee table book. It’s an incredible place to teach Frankie about nature and how we need to respect it. We love this country and want to do what we can to help preserve it for her generation and future generations to come.

What’s your favourite thing about living in Canada?

We love living in a country that celebrates all seasons. We love snowshoeing, skiing, puddle jumping, watching flowers bloom in the spring, swimming, canoeing, going on long hikes in the summer, watching the leaves change colour in the fall, relaxing in front of an outdoor fire and watching the sunset while making s’mores.

i miss the love of my life
i miss the love of my life

 © Used with permission of / © Rogers Media Inc. 2017. This post is part of The Canada Project. You can find out more by clicking the image above.

Airdrie, Alberta

Our family: Dad Navdeep Ghali (deceased), mom Simaran Pandher-Ghali and daughters Aradhana, 2½, and Navaiyah, 1½

Dad Navdeep Ghali baby
Dad Navdeep Ghali baby

 © Used with permission of / © Rogers Media Inc. 2017. Photo: Simmie Pinder-Ghal

Can you tell us about these pictures?

Simaran: This is moments after Aradhana was born. Nav was enamoured with Ara within seconds of her birth.

Nav and Ara
Nav and Ara

 © Used with permission of / © Rogers Media Inc. 2017. Photo: Colleen Gara Photography

This is Nav and Ara during our newborn shoot. Nav was very close to his father, Gurbax, and wanted to incorporate him into the shoot with his pictures in the background. It was very emotional for Nav to be a new dad without his own father being there to experience it with him. Nav was extremely proud of his princess and to be the father of a daughter. Ara was born after four grandsons, so she was a big deal in the family. Nav strived to carry his father’s legacy in any way he could, and our second daughter is Gurbax Navaiyah, named after her paternal grandfather, a tribute to her father’s hero.

newborn shoot for Navaiyah
newborn shoot for Navaiyah

 © Used with permission of / © Rogers Media Inc. 2017. Photo: Mila Boekestyn/Milashka Photography

This is from the newborn shoot for Navaiyah, and Nav’s presence (Nav passed away from a Stage IV peritoneal carcinomatosis on February 4th, 2017 when Simaran was 24 weeks pregnant) was represented everywhere. We wore hoodies during our engagement photos, so we wore the same hoodies during Ara’s newborn photo shoot and incorporated the same hoodies into Nava’s newborn photo shoot to continue our story. We are very relaxed and simple people, and we love—and live in—hoodies. These are our favourite ones, so it’s only natural that they join us on this life journey. After losing Nav, my girls are the reason I breathe, the reason I function each day and the reason I can still see beauty in this life. Nav’s mission in life was to make the world a better place, one tiny act at a time. We’ll continue his legacy as we create our own together as Nav’s girls—the Ghali Girls.

What’s the most challenging thing about raising a family?

The most challenging part is now raising my girls as a single mother, going from making plans as a loving two-parent household to only having myself to rely on and hoping that I’m making the choices my spouse would have wanted. I miss the love of my life with every fibre of my being, but I don’t want my children to feel the gap of the missing parent. That has been the most challenging thing this year.

What’s the most “Canadian” moment you’ve experienced as a family?

The most Canadian moment we experience as a family is our dedication to Tim Hortons. Tims was where we had our first date and our place that we went to during good times and bad times. We took wedding photos there! It’s always in our hands and our cars. It’s the last thing we grab before boarding a flight and the first thing we grab getting off a flight. We walked all over New York to get our fix of Tim Hortons. We travel with it so we can always have a cup while on vacation. We love Tims!

What’s your favourite thing about living in Canada?

For both of us, Canada is home. It is where our parents came and built a life from nothing. The diversity, the opportunities that are present in Canada that aren’t present elsewhere. We both grew up on streets that were a majority of immigrant families. Our parents came here, leaving all they had so we could have a better life and not have to toil so hard because it gives us the luxury of education and unlimited opportunities to grow and succeed in anything we choose. Canada is the freedom to be the best you can be.

Lumsden, Sasktatchewan

Our family: Dad Cal Nugent, mom Nicolle and daughters Noa, 9, and Cate, 6

Cal Nugent daughter with horses
Cal Nugent daughter with horses

 © Used with permission of / © Rogers Media Inc. 2017. Photos: Carey Shaw Photography

Can you tell us about these pictures?

This is Noa giving some extra love to her pony, Willow. Trixie is coming over to get in on the action!

Cal and Cate feeding horse Trixie
Cal and Cate feeding horse Trixie

 © Used with permission of / © Rogers Media Inc. 2017. a little girl and her dad feed a pony a carrot

This is Cal and Cate feeding Trixie a carrot.

Cal wife Nicolle and the girls investigating local plants
Cal wife Nicolle and the girls investigating local plants

 © Used with permission of / © Rogers Media Inc. 2017. a mother and her daughters examine berries in the valley

This is Nicolle and the girls investigating local plants and fall growth in the valley. These pictures depict our favorite aspects of living in the valley. There’s always something to do outside and different discoveries to make as the seasons change.

What’s the most challenging thing about raising a family?

Having enough time to spend together. As the girls grow, they get busier, so our family gets busier. Living outside of the city allows us to slow down and get those extra hours together.

What’s the most “Canadian” moment you’ve experienced as a family?

The most Canadian thing our family experiences is our yearly camping trips. We love to camp in the Cypress Hills, surrounded by lodge pole forests. Family bike rides, walks through the pines with our dog and roasting marshmallows—that’s Canada to us.

Ottawa, Ontario

Our family: Dad Ali, mom Batoul and Hayat, 5 months

Dad Ali, mom Batoul and Hayat, 5 months
Dad Ali, mom Batoul and Hayat, 5 months

 © Used with permission of / © Rogers Media Inc. 2017. Photos: Ali & Batoul

Can you tell us about these pictures?

Ali: This picture was taken in Cape Town, South Africa, on a trip we recently took there. Hayat was an absolute star! Everyone who walked by and saw her stopped to ooh and aah at her. She had just woken up from one of her short catnaps and, being her curious self, starting peeping through to see what was around here.

Dad Ali and Hayat
Dad Ali and Hayat

 © Used with permission of / © Rogers Media Inc. 2017. a baby smiles on her father’s lap while he is fast asleep

This was taken after a night where Hayat stayed up until an ungodly hour and decided she wanted to walk around at 7 a.m. on a Saturday morning. She was decidedly bubbly in the morning—slightly more so than her dad! Ali is completely gutted from a night of no sleep, courtesy of Hayat, but she is all smiles. It’s a really wonderful depiction of what parenting is all about. It’s a mixture of self-sacrifice, heartwarming pride and a commitment to the daily grind (evidenced by the laundry around us), but in the end, we just love this photo because of her. She is infectiously happy, and her cuteness is clearly immeasurable. Pure awesomeness.

Dad Ali's wife Batoul walking Hayat
Dad Ali’s wife Batoul walking Hayat

 © Used with permission of / © Rogers Media Inc. 2017. a mother walks her baby in a stroller at the park

This was taken in Doha, Qatar, in one of the city’s few public parks. It was sweltering.

What’s your favourite family activity?

Travelling and brunch. As you can see from these three pictures, two of the three were taken outside of Canada. Hayat is in for a lifetime of adventure. We love to travel because it’s how we truly learn and feel inspired. It’s about meeting new people, understanding what their lives are all about and seeking to steal a bit of wisdom from every corner of the globe. Hopefully, Hayat is going to play a big part in this journey. Brunch is a close second to travel. There’s nothing more relaxing than eating a nice breakfast on a patio and having the rest of the day ahead of you.

What’s the most “Canadian” moment you’ve experienced as a family?

It was only a few days after our daughter was born, but it was a very “family” moment. Ali went to pick up a crib from a friend who lived deep in the woods of Quebec. He was forewarned not to drive too far up the driveway for fear of getting stuck. Well, he did drive up a little too far and got stuck—and spent the next five hours trying to get out. The tow trucks he called couldn’t get there due to the heavy snowfall—typical of an Ottawa winter. Then when he got home and unpacked the crib, he noticed he had forgotten the screws.

Nelson, British Columbia

Our family: Dad Gabe Sawatzky, mom Amanda Harris, sons Jack, 7½, and Sailor, 5½, grandparents Keith and Kathy Harris and grandmother Cyndy Sawatzky

Where do you live?

Amanda: We’re building a house just outside of Nelson, on the same property I was born. We live beside my parents—they gave us a chunk of property. They were part of the back-to-the-land movement that happened in the late ’60s and early ’70s in this area. They’ve been here for almost 50 years. Land was cheap back then.

Amanda sons painting
Amanda sons painting

 © Used with permission of / © Rogers Media Inc. 2017. Photos: Amanda Harris

Can you tell us about these pictures?

Gabe: They would always be naked if they could. This picture is of them being themselves.

Amanda’s sons muddy while playing

 © Used with permission of / © Rogers Media Inc. 2017. 

Amanda: This happened while I was trying to reupholster the interior of a car and I wasn’t paying attention to what they were doing. I don’t think I could have or would have stopped them—they were having too much fun. This doesn’t really capture how much mud was on them—we had to hose them down outside. I remember doing the same thing when I was young and I lost a lot of rubber boots in the same swamp. I love that our kids are wild.

Amanda’s son Jack by waterfalls

 © Used with permission of / © Rogers Media Inc. 2017. a little boy sitting by a waterfall

Amanda: This picture of Jack was taken last Canada Day, just outside of New Denver, B.C., in a place called Wilson Falls. We hiked in and when we came around the corner, this waterfall was so powerful that you could feel the pressure of the water vibrating in your chest. I was too scared to climb up to the edge, but Jack sat up there for a long time, deep in thought. I remember this moment, and I was scared and in awe.

Amanda’s son Jack at school

 © Used with permission of / © Rogers Media Inc. 2017. 

Amanda: This is in my upholstery room, which I converted to a home-schooling room. We use a lot of glue.

What’s the most “Canadian” moment you’ve experienced as a family?

Amanda: We have a moose that lives in the swamp above where the mud fight took place. It charged my Dad and brother. We have a mom and two baby grizzlies that come down to our backyard and eat the grass in spring.

Gabe: Hiking four hours up to Jumbo Glacier with our family and friends, hitting a snowstorm and having to turn around, and then hiking down for three hours with a four-year-old and a six-year-old.

What’s your favourite thing about living in Canada?

Amanda: Healthcare! Just this week, I brought Sailor to the emergency room because he was coughing and couldn’t catch his breath. It became extremely serious very fast. We stayed in the ICU for two nights and three days and made two more trips to his family doctor. This all happened over the past five days. It was pneumonia and an asthma attack, and it was the scariest day of my life. The emergency team of doctors and nurses was amazing! I’m very thankful for our healthcare.

Oakville, Ontario

Our family: Dad Carlo Mendoza, mom Laurie and sons Liam, 7, and Jamie, 5

 

Carlo Mendoza son Liam
Carlo Mendoza son Liam

 © Used with permission of / © Rogers Media Inc. 2017. Photos: Carlo Mendoza

Can you tell us about these pictures?

Carlo: This is Liam when he was two. After eating his favourite food, ice cream, he wanted more. Because of the look on his face, he probably got some!

Carlo Mendoza wife Laurie with Liam
Carlo Mendoza wife Laurie with Liam

 © Used with permission of / © Rogers Media Inc. 2017. a mother and her son touch foreheads

This is a picture of Laurie with Liam on a swing in our backyard, moments before Laurie gave him a kiss.

Carlo Mendoza son Liam in play room
Carlo Mendoza son Liam in play room

 © Used with permission of / © Rogers Media Inc. 2017. two brothers playing in a barn

This is Jamie watching Liam jump off the second level on to the mats at the play barn at Bronte Provincial Park. We try to spend some time hiking around the park and visiting the animals. Even when we think they’re too tired for the play barn, they always perk up and find the energy.

Carlo Mendoza son Liam and Jamie on trampoline
Carlo Mendoza son Liam and Jamie on trampoline

 © Used with permission of / © Rogers Media Inc. 2017. two brothers on a trampoline

Jamie and Liam are jumping on a trampoline in our backyard. They go on the trampoline almost every chance they get.

What’s the most challenging thing about raising a family?

The most challenging thing about raising two young boys is focusing their energy so that they don’t get too out of control. It really is amazing how much good energy they have. All they want to do is learn and move—constantly.

What’s the most “Canadian” moment you’ve experienced as a family?

I think that one of the most “Canadian” things we do is that we’re outside no matter what the weather. We’ve gone camping and hiking in the sun, rain and snow. We ride our bikes in the winter. With the different weather in all four seasons, we’re always ready to do anything outside.

What’s your favourite thing about living in Canada?

The best part about living in Canada is the cultural diversity and acceptance we have here. As a second-generation Canadian in a mixed-race marriage with two adopted boys of different ethnicities, we’re not your traditional family, but no one has ever made us feel otherwise.

Vancouver, British Columbia

Our family: Dad Stephen Wilde, mom Jessie Teng and son Edward, 9

Stephen Wilde son Edward, 9
Stephen Wilde son Edward, 9

 © Used with permission of / © Rogers Media Inc. 2017. Photos: Stephen Wilde

Can you tell us about these pictures?

Stephen: We’re extremely fortunate to live within biking distance (on a nice day!) or a short drive from Pacific Spirit Park in Vancouver. Pacific Spirit Regional Park is an 874-hectare park located in the University Endowment Lands and is a forest oasis. This is Ed after a perfectly rainy, muddy ride. I love the exhaustion yet satisfaction of getting out in the mud on the bike portrayed here.

Stephen Wilde son Edward on bike
Stephen Wilde son Edward on bike

 © Used with permission of / © Rogers Media Inc. 2017. a boy biking

Ed in action on the trails at Pacific Spirit Regional Park. Besides baseball, riding is Ed’s passion.

Stephen Wilde wife Jessie Teng and son Edward
Stephen Wilde wife Jessie Teng and son Edward

 © Used with permission of / © Rogers Media Inc. 2017. a boy and mom playing connect four

This is one of the many Connect Four games that Ed wins while camping in Big Bob, our 1973 Ford motorhome.

Stephen Wilde wife Jessie Teng and son Edward breakfast
Stephen Wilde wife Jessie Teng and son Edward breakfast

 © Used with permission of / © Rogers Media Inc. 2017. a boy and his mom having breakfast

Pancakes and bacon with Jessie and Ed—the perfect way to start a day of adventures in Big Bob.

What’s your favourite family activity?

Edward is an avid baseball player, which has led to many hours spent at the diamond as a spectator, field worker, assistant coach, picture taker, parent, knee icer, scrape patcher, water getter and sun-shade holder. Besides baseball, we’re campers. We love the smell of clothing filled with that campfire aroma!

What’s the most “Canadian” moment you’ve experienced as a family?

Ed and I watching as Jessie was sworn in as a Canadian citizen during a Canada Day celebration at Fort Langley Park, B.C.

What’s your favourite thing about living in Canada?

It wouldn’t matter which region, province, city, endless stretch of road, shoreline, small village or forest, Canada inspires a sense of adventure and exploration unequalled in all of my lifelong travels.

Steinbach, Manitoba

Our family: Dad Chris Freund, mom Lisa Cichelly and son Julien, 7

Chris Freund son Julien, 7
Chris Freund son Julien, 7

 © Used with permission of / © Rogers Media Inc. 2017. Photos: Lisa Cichelly

Can you tell us about these pictures?

Lisa: We live on several acres of a Christmas tree farm, and snowshoeing is one of my favourite solo activities. Julien decided to accompany me this time, so I let him use my snowshoes and I used his father’s. Since these are so big on him, he didn’t last long before we had to turn around, but at least he tried!

Chris Freund and son Julien in Disneyland
Chris Freund and son Julien in Disneyland

 © Used with permission of / © Rogers Media Inc. 2017. boy and father run on beach

Last July, we took our first family holiday in six years. We went for broke and went to Legoland and Disneyland in California. Julien and Chris ran from the waves for an hour and were soaked by the time we went back to the hotel. This holiday taught us a valuable life lesson: Take more holidays!

Chris Freund and son Julien at Steinbach Parade
Chris Freund and son Julien at Steinbach Parade

 © Used with permission of / © Rogers Media Inc. 2017. a boy being held at pride

We’re at Steinbach’s first Pride Parade. Steinbach is a very conservative and highly religious town, and Chris and I are secular and not conservative. It’s important to me to raise Julien with our values: acceptance, freedom and love for all. Cars were lined up down the highway for 10 kilometres as people tried to get into Steinbach for the inaugural event. On the way home afterwards, I asked Julien what he’d learned at the Pride Parade and he said, “Love is love, and we should love all people.” I had tears in my eyes. Mom win!

Chris Freund son Julien hiking
Chris Freund son Julien hiking

 © Used with permission of / © Rogers Media Inc. 2017. a boy walks alone in the woods

This was taken in our backyard on the Christmas tree farm. Julien almost always brings a stick on our walks to fight dragons, be a ninja and play in the creek.

What’s the most “Canadian” moment you’ve experienced as a family?

We were doing our favourite hike in Kenora, the Tunnel Island Hike, and a local was hiking with his dog. He gave Julien a big speech about the history of Kenora and passed him a rock from his pocket and told him it was an ancient scraping tool, used by aboriginal people on caribou hides. It felt very Canadian to get such a cool gift from a stranger in the Canadian Shield.

Toronto, Ontario

Our family: Mom Lori Chodos, son Tomás Moreno, 4, grandmother Linda Chodos and grandfather Douglas Millstone

Lori Chodos and son Tomás Moreno, 4
Lori Chodos and son Tomás Moreno, 4

 © Used with permission of / © Rogers Media Inc. 2017. Photos: Lori Chodos

Can you tell us about these pictures?

Lori: Getting ready for bathtime. I have so few pictures of the two of us, especially in candid moments (I’m usually the one behind the camera). I love that you can see how much he cracks me up.

Lori Chodos son Tomás Moreno with grandfather
Lori Chodos son Tomás Moreno with grandfather

 © Used with permission of / © Rogers Media Inc. 2017. a boy and grandfather talking together

Teaching his papito Jaime how to play the xylophone. I love the way they’re looking at each other. Now that we live in Canada (we moved from Peru), Tomás doesn’t see his grandfather regularly, but they talk online a lot so they don’t miss a beat when they’re together in person.

What’s your favourite family activity?

Bedtime stories and snuggles are still pretty up there. Lately, he also makes me sing Johnny Cash until I’m hoarse while he provides the instrumentals.

What’s the most challenging thing about raising a family?

When Tomás was little, the challenges were mostly about the basics of keeping him alive; now, they’re far more wide ranging and terrifying. There are the challenges of trying to balance my job and home life. And there are the challenges of helping him grow into an independent, empathetic, creative, curious person while trying to be the most patient, least exhausted parent I can be—and also keep him alive.

What’s the most “Canadian” moment you’ve experienced as a family?

When Tomás first started daycare in Canada, he became obsessed with the Canadian flag and the national anthem, which they sing at school every morning. We got him some Canadian flags and now he makes us sing the anthem at home all the time while we wave our flags.

What’s your favourite thing about living in Canada?

Being close to my family.

Whitehorse, Yukon Territory

Our family: Dad Gabriel Ellis, mom Amanda Bartle and daughters Kaya, 4, and Aloe, 1

Gabriel Ellis, mom Amanda and daughters Kaya, 4, and Aloe, 1
Gabriel Ellis, mom Amanda and daughters Kaya, 4, and Aloe, 1

 © Used with permission of / © Rogers Media Inc. 2017. Photos: Gabriel Ellis

Can you tell us about these pictures?

Gabriel: We really value travel and jumped at the opportunity to take the kids to Thailand on our parental leave. We all piled into this colourful tuk tuk on the streets of Chiang Mai in northern Thailand. Kaya loved the freedom of riding with the wind blowing through her hair. “Faster, faster!” she would shout at the tuk tuk driver. “I’m flying!”

Dad Gabriel Ellis daughter Kaya
Dad Gabriel Ellis daughter Kaya

 © Used with permission of / © Rogers Media Inc. 2017. a little girl in a field picking flowers

We have a cabin two hours south of Whitehorse in Atlin, British Columbia. Every summer, we love going down and spending time with the kids outside. The family-friendly Atlin Music Festival in July is definitely a highlight. The flowers in Atlin in spring are amazing, and Kaya loves picking them for her mom.

Dad Gabriel Ellis daughter Aloe
Dad Gabriel Ellis daughter Aloe

 © Used with permission of / © Rogers Media Inc. 2017. a little girl exploring the forest

Walking in the forest is one of our favourite family activities. Aloe loves her independence and always tries to run off. Sometimes when we’re walking on a path that is straight and narrow, she’ll flip the script and her cavalier attitude will kick in. She’ll go all ‘into the wild’ by going into the bush by herself.

What’s your favourite family activity?

After walking through the woods, we like to sit in the hot tub and curl up by a crackling wood fire with a cup of hot cocoa and read Cuddles the Cow for, like, the millionth time.

What’s the most challenging thing about raising a family?

Infant car seats. Breaking your already-broken back trying to put them in and cleaning all the small crevices with a toothbrush once they’ve been puked on and, at the same time, being thankful that you’re not on the side of the road in the middle of nowhere at –40 in the winter—like last time.

What’s the most “Canadian” moment you’ve experienced as a family?

One summer, our entire family came out to the cabin in Atlin for a week of wood fires, cold-lake swimming, hot springs, barbecues, saunas, fishing, canoeing and biking, but the first night was full of drama because a bat flew in through the cabin window. We tried sheets and nets to try to get it out without waking up the kids or contracting rabies. When we finally succeeded, “Courage” by the Tragically Hip was playing in the background.

What’s your favourite thing about living in Canada?

Waking up to a loon swimming across a quiet lake while sipping an old-school hand-frothed latte in a hanging hammock chair before digging into a plate of pancakes covered in maple syrup with the entire family around the table.

Toronto, Ontario

Our family: Dad Chansa Kalunga, mom Kate Wilson and sons Imaani, 6½, and Arlo, 15 months

Chansa Kalunga sons Imaani, 6½, and Arlo, 15 months
Chansa Kalunga sons Imaani, 6½, and Arlo, 15 months

 © Used with permission of / © Rogers Media Inc. 2017. Photos: Kate Wilson

Can you tell us about these pictures?

Kate: This shows a typical weekend morning, where we all end up in the same bed and the boys interact with each other. I love to watch them develop a relationship. There are five years between them, but they connected quickly and adore each other. They continue to have almost daily moments like this. I wanted this for Imaani—to have a good friend in his sibling—but seeing it play out has been pretty heartwarming.

Chansa Kalunga son Imaani, 6½
Chansa Kalunga son Imaani, 6½

 © Used with permission of / © Rogers Media Inc. 2017. a young boy with cerebral palsy plays soccer in a gym

Imaani is doing a drill at his adapted soccer program. Imaani is a bit of a sports fan, but he increasingly asks to not only be a spectator but play too. Imaani has cerebral palsy. This is the first sport he played and the first time we’ve been involved with something like this. He plays hard each week. There may have been a time when he was younger when I wouldn’t have thought this was possible, but here he is playing soccer and now he’s starting to play baseball. It’s really neat to see a kid’s dream come true.

What’s the most challenging thing about raising a family?

There are a few challenges, but they just seem to be part of the gig, so you adapt. With the birth of Arlo, we’re trying to widen the scope a bit and not get so caught up in day-to-day routines. For Imaanis’s early years, a lot of time was spent at appointments related to his disability. There are still appointments, but we want to open up our lives. That could be taking a simple overnight road trip that will hopefully lead to bigger trips and more travel or seeking out new classes and activities that Imaani can try besides therapy, like soccer, baseball and robotics.

What’s the most “Canadian” moment you’ve experienced as a family?

This year, we attended a Toronto FC game with toques, gloves and blankets while the players were running around in shorts. Other fans had snowpants on. It was technically spring, but it was a really cold night. We hung in as long as we could because it was our first Toronto FC game. Oh, and we eat a lot of maple syrup—like, a lot.

What’s your favourite thing about living in Canada?

Imaani says he likes Canada because Canada is where home is. With Imaani’s extra healthcare needs, I think being in Canada has made a huge difference. We’ve been able to access many resources with little to no cost. Not being saddled with medical bills has been really important. Instead, we can focus on raising a family and make sure our kids get what they need while giving them other opportunities.

Calgary, Alberta

Our family: Dad Carl White, mom Tabetha, daughter Siena, 13, and son Pthaylo, 10

Carl White and family
Carl White and family

 © Used with permission of / © Rogers Media Inc. 2017. Photos: Carl & Tabetha White

Can you tell us about these pictures?

Carl: This is me, Tabetha and Siena riding the chairlift at Sunshine Mountain. We’re all avid snowboarders. I’m a snowboard instructor from the first wave of snowboarding in the late ’80s and early ’90s. Our first date was snowboarding, and now both kids are on the Riders on Board snowboard team all winter long. Families who shred together stay together!

Carl White, daughter Siena, 13, and son Pthaylo, 10
Carl White, daughter Siena, 13, and son Pthaylo, 10

 © Used with permission of / © Rogers Media Inc. 2017. a family on a skateboard trip

We took a family skateboard tour of Southern California, hitting two or three parks every day, including straight from the airport to the Venice Beach skate park. No Disney, no rides—just skating every day was heaven. To watch my kids drop into an 11-foot-deep bowl in the heart of California among pros and legends with confidence was an inspiration to an old dog like myself.

Carl White daughter Siena, 13
Carl White daughter Siena, 13

 © Used with permission of / © Rogers Media Inc. 2017. a young girl skateboarding at a ramp

Siena skating the vertical bowl at a local skate park. Siena skates with an all-girls skateboard club called 100% Skateboard Club that was created to empower girls young and old to get out and mix it up with the boys at

#girlswhoshred!

What’s the most “Canadian” moment you’ve experienced as a family?

Christmas in the mountains, snowflakes gently falling and pine trees heavy with blankets of snow—a special quiet that has to be experienced.

Montreal, Quebec

Our family: Dad Martin Gravel, mom Tracey Steer, son Oliver, 13½, and daughter Ava, 9½

Our Family: Dad Martin Gravel, mom Tracey Steer, son Oliver, 13½, and daughter Ava, 9½
Our Family: Dad Martin Gravel, mom Tracey Steer, son Oliver, 13½, and daughter Ava, 9½

 © Used with permission of / © Rogers Media Inc. 2017. Photos: Tracey Steer

Can you tell us about these pictures?

Tracey: We had just finished walking my aunt and uncle back to their hotel on the last day of their stay in town. We continued walking down Sherbrooke Street together, chatting happily. It was a nice day, but in the world they look different to me, and I can actually see how much they’ve grown when we’re out on the street.

Martin Gravel son Oliver, 13 birthday party
Martin Gravel son Oliver, 13 birthday party

 © Used with permission of / © Rogers Media Inc. 2017. A family hugging at the dinner table

This is Oliver’s 13th birthday dinner at home. We ordered sushi, which is always the children’s celebratory dinner choice. We were just saying how much we loved him, and we all started hugging.

What’s the most “Canadian” moment you’ve experienced as a family?

We feel pretty Canadian when we drive Grandpa’s ATV into the woods at the cottage over to the neighbouring sugar shack and come back with a dozen cans of maple syrup. We’ll makeshift a cabane à sucre and cook a big breakfast with French toast, berries, sausages and eggs. Later, we’ll boil some syrup and pour it over a panful of snow to eat—it’s called tire d’érable.

What’s your favourite thing about living in Canada?

We feel entirely free to be who we are. We’re proud Canadians! (And we’re glad that we don’t live in the United States—especially these days.)

Ulukhaktok, Northwest Territories

Our family: Dad Duncan Marsh, mom Kelly, grandmother Marion Duncan and daughters Elizabeth, 2½, and Marion, six months

Duncan Marsh and daughter Elizabeth, 2½ jump in puddles
Duncan Marsh and daughter Elizabeth, 2½ jump in puddles

 © Used with permission of / © Rogers Media Inc. 2017. Photos: Duncan Marsh

Can you tell us about these pictures?

Elizabeth and her daddy stop during a quad ride on land to jump in muddy puddles! Elizabeth’s favourite TV character is Peppa Pig, who always jumps in muddy puddles, so now she gets to jump in muddy puddles, too.

Duncan Marsh, daughters Elizabeth, plating on frozen lake
Duncan Marsh, daughters Elizabeth, plating on frozen lake

 © Used with permission of / © Rogers Media Inc. 2017. a little girl sits in a snowsuit on the ice

Elizabeth is playing on the frozen lake during a Ski-Doo ride with her mom and dad. This lake is called Father’s Lake, where many people in the community go to get ice for drinks during the winter months. This picture demonstrates just how relaxed our life is in the North. Not a care in the world and lots of time to just relax on the ice.

Duncan Marsh daughters Elizabeth flying her kite
Duncan Marsh daughters Elizabeth flying her kite

 © Used with permission of / © Rogers Media Inc. 2017. a little girl flies a kite in the winter in a snowy field

Elizabeth is flying her kite while taking advantage of the frequent winds we have off the Beaufort Sea. This was Elizabeth’s first time flying her kite and she was absolutely beside herself—she was so excited! I also love that there is a dog team on the frozen sea captured in the background of the picture.

What’s your favourite family activity?

Going on quad and Ski-Doo adventures out on the land.

What’s the most challenging thing about raising a family?

The two most challenging things about raising a family in an isolated community in the North are dealing with the cost of living and adapting to the environment. We have to order many things online. If we can get what we need at the store, it usually costs double or triple what it would cost down south. The winters are cold and dark. At times we can’t go outside because the temperature drops to –50, and it’s even colder than that with the windchill. We have 24 hours of darkness for a few months in winter and 24 hours of daylight in summer.

What’s your favourite thing about living in Canada?

Being able to experience so many places with such drastic differences while staying in our beautiful country. Some of the differences we’ve experienced are living in places with and without trees, having 24 hours of daylight and darkness, living right by the ocean and living inland, and living in communities where we drive cars, trucks, quads and Ski-Doos.

Different “classes” of the Canadian Spouse Visa

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Hello,

If you want to bring your spouse or “significant other” to Canada there are many ways to do so. To do it legally is the fun part.

If one partner/spouse is a Canadian citizen they can sponsor their partner to come into Canada. You partner may be of either sex as long as your marriage is legally valid. It does not legally matter what sex the partners in a relationship are.

The partnership can be a legal marriage, common-law partners, conjugal, or a same sex partnership.

Partners – either of the opposite sex or same sex – can be in exceptional circumstances beyond their control that prevent them from qualifying as common-law partners or spouses by living together. Perhaps one conjugal partner is legally married to someone who walked out? Perhaps one partner is legally married in a country where divorce is not allowed? Perhaps you have lived together in a country where same sex marriages are not allowed? But still the relationship exists and you want to have a chance for it to grow and blossom.

Proof of a “marital” style relationship is mandatory. Can the relationship be shown to exist? Is it long standing? Are there shared bills? Do you own property in common? Place of residence, shared expenses, invoices, testimonials, time living together, time living apart, and other proof play an important role and each should be documented to prove the relationship is real and long standing.

Things like these prove a relationship. Children, adopted or otherwise, also help “prove” a relationship.

According to the government there are different “classes” of relationship

COMMON-LAW PARTNER

You are a common-law partner – either of the opposite sex or same sex – if you have been living together in a conjugal relationship for at least one year. It is very important that they prove that what will be presented is coherent and complete. Place of residence, shared expenses, invoices, testimonials, time living together, time living apart, and other proof play an important role. We know that getting a permanent resident visa for your common-law partner will be a very important event in your life.

Subjectivity plays an important part in Canadian spousal sponsorships. We know the Canada spouse sponsorship process very well. Errors or omissions could delay your spouse visa application or even lead to a refusal. We, as Canadian Certified Immigration Consultants will represent you before Citizenship and Immigration Canada in order to obtain the Permanent Resident visa for your spouse. Don’t risk your future. Send us a message or fill out the form so that we can assess your case.

CONJUGAL PARTNER

This category is for partners – either of the opposite sex or same sex – in exceptional circumstances beyond their control that prevent them from qualifying as common-law partners or spouses by living together.

Canadian citizens and permanent residents who live in Canada can sponsor their loved ones and help them to get a Permanent Resident Spouse Visa for Canada through the Family Class program. The conjugal partner category is for partners – either of the opposite sex or same sex – in exceptional circumstances beyond their control that prevent them from qualifying as common-law partners or spouses by living together.

The conjugal partner stream only applies where the partner of the Canadian person is married in a country where divorce does not exist, or to a same sex relationship where the partner of the Canadian person lives in a country where the same sex marriage does not exist. Proof of a “marital” relationship is mandatory. We can help you to understand how to show the government that there is a relationship and the visa is a necessity.

Same Sex Marriage

As only a few countries recognize same sex marriage, most of the spouse sponsorship applications for Canada are processed using the common-law partner stream. As of August 2013 the countries that recognize same sex marriage are: Argentina, Belgium, Brazil, Canada, Denmark, France, Iceland, The Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Portugal, Spain, South Africa, Sweden, Uruguay and some USA states (California, Connecticut, Delaware, Iowa, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Minnesota, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Rhode Island, Vermont and Washington, the District of Columbia, eight counties in New Mexico).

You are a common-law partner – either of the opposite sex or same sex – if you have been living together in a conjugal relationship for at least one year.

Sponsoring a partner using the common-law stream makes the spouse sponsorship application a little more difficult. The fact that the couple is not married poses a challenge. It is very important that the proof that will be presented be coherent and complete. Place of residence, shared expenses, invoices, testimonials, time living together, time living apart, and other proof play an important role. We are Canadian immigration experts specialized in spouse sponsorship applications. Getting a permanent resident visa for your common-law partner will be a very important event in your life.

Even if you have a marriage certificate, you also have to show evidence that your relationship is real. All the proof that was mentioned above also applies for this stream of application.

Fiancés Visas

A few years ago, there used to be a fiancé visa but it does not exist anymore. However you do have the following options:

  1. a) If you have cohabited with your fiancé for more than one year you could consider the common-law partner stream.
  2. b) If you have had a conjugal relationship and for exceptional circumstances you cannot live together then you may consider the conjugal partner stream.
  3. c) If none of these options apply to you then you could consider marriage in order to start the spouse sponsorship application. Canadian citizens and permanent residents who live in Canada can sponsor their loved ones and help them to get a Permanent Resident Spouse Visa for Canada through the Family Class program.
  4. d) If you do not want to start a spouse sponsorship application right now we can help you to prepare a visitor visa. Please click here for more information.

Subjectivity plays an important part in Canadian spousal sponsorships.  We know the Canada’s spouse sponsorship process very well.  Errors or omissions could delay your spouse visa application or even lead to refusals.  As Certified Immigration Consultants we will represent you before Citizenship and Immigration Canada in order to obtain the Permanent Resident visa for your spouse.

For further information please; Call us at (705) 795-3535

Or Write us at info@cicimmigration.ca or Contact Us

respectfully,

Gordon Davis

gdavis@cicimmigration.ca

 

CiCimmigration, 262 Rose Street Suite 310, Barrie, Ontario, L4N 5R2
Phone #: 1-705-795-3535     e-mail: assessments@cicimmigration.ca     www.cicimmigration.ca

 

Pre-approved Canadian LMIA paperwork and our referral program

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Our company has a referral program. So each person who uses a referral code that we provide to you and pays their fees gets a 20% discount from their fees and the person whose fee they use gets an amount equal to the 20% given to the person applying for a visa through us receives for the referral. So the more people you refer the more you earn.

1) We have several companies that we are already working with who have looked for employees within Canada for many months. As they can not find people who are trained and willing to do the work for the wages they are offering those companies have applied for, and many have already received LMIA papers from the federal government. That frees them up to hire workers who are looking to enter Canada into the workforce here.

To get an LMIA each company has to look for a suitable worker and then apply to the federal government. That takes roughly 18 months. As I said different companies are already pre-approved and have received LMIA papers for different positions they are looking to fill. Those positions need only have suitable workers lined up to fill the positions within the companies.

A work visa can take 4 to 6 months depending whose desk it lands on and how high the pile of paper on their desk already is. Government workers here are union so they work at their own special pace. 🙂

The worker does not pay for the LMIA. The company looking for the employees is the one paying those fees and getting approval. The worker only applies for a work visa, and any family visas, needed by them. If anyone has told you differently they are probably pocketing the funds you give them for the LMIA. Be careful who you trust. We are the only ones who put it in writing that you get your visa or you get your money back.

2) People pay when they register for us to do the work. If they want to fill out the form at: http://cicimmigration.ca/free-express-entry-evaluation-form We can see if they match anyone who already has an LMIA. If they agree to go with our firm they pay the fees through us when they register.

3) Any paperwork between the person who wants to come to Canada is private and personal. Our company will not give out any papers or information to anyone other than the Federal Immigration people and the client that we work for. Under no conditions will anyone who works here give out copies of government or private papers or personal information to anyone except the person that those papers are for.

4) I believe I have already explained about the referral program in a previous blog.

5) Any funds paid to us for doing work is paid to us through paypal. That way we have no information about credit cards or bank numbers. If a company can accept payments through paypal that shows that they are reputable because anytime a service is not provided by a company the client can simply let paypal know and all that companies funds on paypal are frozen. A very good reason to be reputable and a good proof that any firm is reputable is that they can accept payments through paypal.

 

With respect,

Gordon Davis

gdavis@cicimmigration.ca

 

CiCimmigration, 262 Rose Street Suite 310, Barrie, Ontario, L4N 5R2
Phone #: 1-705-795-3535     e-mail: assessments@cicimmigration.ca     www.cicimmigration.ca

 

Stay out of the United States! Abuse by TSA Agents at airport security

Please be aware that Canada has many differences from the United States. Here questions are asked and people are screened when there are questions or concerns. But it is nothing like America. Here below you will see videos and news reports of what is occurring on a daily basis in the United States.

Please, if you want to enjoy the lifestyle, education, and work experiences available to everyone, come to Canada and stay out of the U.S.

For those of you who want to watch here are some of the many videos about TSA (the U.S. Transportation Safety Authority) and airport security within the United States. Also be aware that they want to bring their version of “security” to those traveling between different States in the U.S. as well.

Awkward Airport Security Moments – TSA Abuse

The people screening passengers at American airports can do anything they want without excuse simply because they decide to do so. (Be aware that the maker of the video have inserted cartoon images into the video to try to lighten the shock and images of the video. But the video has many shocking images.)

 

Look at what is being covered up in Airports in America

People ORDERED TO drop their pants, open their bras, “cavity searches” where they insert their fingers, and flashlights up inside women and into the rear of men and children because the security people claim they “are looking for drugs and bombs. ”

 

Meanwhile TSA (Transportation Security Agency) agents are using drugs on the job. If you forward the video to 2 minutes in you can see what they do with a 2 year old boy who needs leg braces to walk. Agents let a person carrying a bomb go through security on Christmas day. While a 4 year old child was ordered to remove his leg braces and then told if he can not walk through security he could not fly on the plane.

If you forward the video to 3 minutes and 13 seconds in you can see where a woman was arrested, strip searched, and spent a year in jail, in court, paying for lawyers, going before 2 different judges in court. What for? She wanted to carry a clear plastic container of apple sauce with her on the plane for her 93 year old mother to eat. Because she could at least eat that with her dentures.

 

 

And there are more…

Close Encounters Of the TSA (Part 2) “people Targeted” When is it to much?

TSA’s outright Molestation of passengers

 

Please stay out of the United States. Come to Canada and enjoy the freedoms we have here. No one should be put through the things that America chooses to do to abuse people there on a daily basis. I believe that “the home of the free” has gone straight to hell. What do you think?

Sincerely,

Gordon Davis

gdavis@cicimmigration.ca

 

CiCimmigration, 262 Rose Street Suite 310, Barrie, Ontario, L4N 5R2
Phone #: 1-705-795-3535     e-mail: assessments@cicimmigration.ca     www.cicimmigration.ca

 

 

the Canadian governments Labour Market Impact Assessment

 

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LMIA (former LMO) Labour Market Impact Assessment and Work Permits for hiring Foreign Workers

Canada has thousands of foreign workers and more than 90,000 obtain this visa to work temporarily in Canada every year.  Unlike other firms who give a price range and then add fees for “extra services” we state our price for services right up front. We also state clearly and without a doubt our guarantee to every one of our clients.

If you fill in the forms with answers that are honest and complete and do not hide anything from us such as having a criminal record we GAURANTEE that you will receive your visa or all the funds you have paid for our services will be refunded in full. This goes for payments made for college enrollment, visa applications, citizen paperwork, etc. You get what you pay for or you get your money back. That simple.

Any time a company in Canada can not find workers here in Canada that have the needed skills to safely do a job that needs to be done they are allowed to look outside of Canada for those workers. Whenever that happens the company will apply for an LMIA (a Labour Market Impact Assessment). THE COMPANY THAT WILL HIRE THE FOREIGN WORKER GETS THE LIMIA not the foreign worker.

 

About the LMIA Process:

The Labour Market Impact Assessment LMIA  (former Labour Market Opinion (LMO) ) is a report issued by Employment and Social Development Canada that outlines the impact that hiring a foreign worker would have on Canada’s labour market. Employers need to obtain this assessment in order to hire foreign workers. This is the employers responsibility. It is NOT the workers problem. Those who want to come apply for a work permit. The company that invites the foreign worker is the one who applies for and needs to obtain the LMIA. If the assessment is positive, a report outlining the conditions of the job being offered by the employer, the names of the employees, and also the expiry date of the LMIA will be listed in the document issued by ESDC (Employment and Social Development Canada).

Once a positive LMIA has been issued, it must be forwarded to the employees abroad to enable them to obtain a visa and/or a work permit that will allow them entry to the country with the rights and obligations of any other worker. If the worker is already in Canada, a work permit renewal application must be submitted. CiCImmigration can also handle the processing of the work permit and visas for the workers abroad or the work permit extensions inside Canada.

Recent changes to the Temporary Foreign Worker Program have made it more difficult for employers to obtain a positive LMIA. We strongly recommend hiring the services of an expert. We have successfully processed hundreds of applications. We have a specialized team that only deals with Labour Market Impact Assessments (LMIA). Service Canada receives thousands of applications per year which they accept or refuse depending on different circumstances. Service Canada will check if:

  • The number of foreign workers in your company are within the cap established by the government.
  • The job offer and the company are genuine.
  • The wages and working conditions are in line with those offered to Canadians (NOC wages).
  • Employers conducted reasonable efforts to hire or train Canadians for the job.
  • The foreign worker is filling a labour shortage OR if hiring a foreign worker will directly create new job opportunities or help to retain jobs for Canadians OR the foreign worker will transfer new skills and knowledge to Canadians.
  • This hiring will not affect a labour dispute or the employment of any Canadian worker involved in such a dispute.

There are also situations where pre-approvals are requested.  Where Canadian employers have already searched and found no one willing, capable, and/or trained that can do the work safely and efficiently. A pre-approval allows the employer to recruit foreign workers with the security that once suitable foreign workers have been recruited, positive Labour Market Impact Assessments will be issued.

Finally, there are some pilot projects and special programs that are in effect for most provinces.  These vary in conditions and requirements according to the specific needs of each province.

Many programs or pilot projects have been launched to facilitate the processing of Labour Market Impact Assessments throughout the country such as:

  • Hiring Temporary Foreign Workers for Occupations Under Pressure;
  • Live-in Caregiver Program;
  • Seasonal Agricultural Worker Program (SAWP);
  • Employment of International Students Graduating from Recognized Post-Secondary Institutions;
  • Hiring Foreign Information Technology Specialists;

We will gladly provide you with a free assessment of your particular case and tell you the possible venues in which you can obtain a positive Labour Market Impact Assessment LMIA. Please contact us and we will gladly help you understand more clearly how we can handle your particular case.

Sincerely,

Gordon Davis

gdavis@cicimmigration.ca

 

 

CiCimmigration, 262 Rose Street Suite 310, Barrie, Ontario, L4N 5R2
Phone #: 1-705-795-3535     e-mail: assessments@cicimmigration.ca     www.cicimmigration.ca

 

the Steps needed to get a Canadian work visa

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The easiest way for anyone to reach us is through clicking the reply button to send us an email. Others use the link on our website at: http://cicimmigration.ca/contact

Our firm is registered, licenced, etc. For example Mr. Manu Datta (MD) is licensed through   I.C.C.R.C. Membership Number:R 409559 and the CIC (Canada Immigration Commission) to work as a registered immigration consultant.

Those who desire to come to Canada for work would follow these steps. You can see general information here at: http://cicimmigration.ca/work-permits

First you need to fill in the online form at:

http://cicimmigration.ca/free-express-entry-evaluation-form

Then you would click on the link for our rates page. This shows what we charge for our services:

http://cicimmigration.ca/services-rates

For example to do the paperwork and act as your legal representative before Canada Immigration for a work permit we charge $790.00

It takes roughly six to eight weeks for us to hear back from Canada Immigration whether they see the persons skills as needed and in competition to those already within Canada. We have several firms who have already been granted an LMIA (a labour market exemption for foreign workers). We can use one of these Companies when we file for your work permit.

Once we get the response from the Canada Immigration Commission the person applying would need to submit the fee for the government people to do their part of the work. You can see a list of the CIC fees at:

http://www.cic.gc.ca/english/information/fees/fees.asp

The Federal government fee for a work permit is:

Work permit (including extensions) – per person              $155

The person applying would submit the fess through our website. Simply scroll down the page to the link for Work Permits and submit the fees through Paypal to us. That way as long as the information submitted in the application form is accurate and there is nothing hidden such as a criminal background if the visa is not granted we would provide the with a full refund of all fees paid through our firm.

If you would like to do so you can also become an affiliate with our firm. Doing that we would give you a code you can use to receive 20% off of our fees. You can also earn 20% of the fees those you refer pay for their own visas through our firm. They simply put a note in the webpage upon applying that they were referred by you and the code for the referral. Once we see that fee for that person is paid we submit to you the commission for the referral.

What most people do not understand is that a work permit is just that, a work permit. It authorizes the person to work anywhere within Canada. So if they do not like the work they started with when entering Canada they are free to look for, and switch to, any other job they desire. As long as the person who has entered Canada is working CIC has no problem with that person and their family staying within Canada.

Once they have been within Canada for three months immigrants within Canada can file to bring others to be with them. Be they a wife, son, daughter. Anyone who is a blood relation as distant as a second cousin can come to be in Canada with them. The government will look to see if their sponsor has committed any crimes while in Canada, if they are working, do they understand English or French well enough to take care of their own day to day needs. If the CIC is satisfied with that then the CIC will grant a visa for each family member that they desire to sponsor to come to be in Canada with them.

There are many people where the family pools their funds so that the first person can come to Canada. Then each three months the person here applies for one more family member to come until everyone who wants to be here has arrived.

I hope this answers your questions. Please feel free to write to me if there is anything else you would like to know.

With respect,

Gordon Davis

gdavis@cicimmigration.ca

 

CiCimmigration, 262 Rose Street Suite 310, Barrie, Ontario, L4N 5R2
Phone #: 1-705-795-3535     e-mail: assessments@cicimmigration.ca   www.cicimmigration.ca